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Ormond Beach Library Display

Early Botanical Explorers

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This portion of the display showcases a few of the plants that have been named for several of the naturalists and botanists that explored Florida throughout history.

Pine Lily and Pines - Lilium catesbaei - Mark Catesby (1683-1749)    $     ?
Pine Lily and Pines - Lilium catesbaei - Mark Catesby (1683-1749)
"Pine Lily and Pines" is a low-angle view of a Catesby's lily, named for Mark Catesby who explored the southeastern colonies in the 1720's and later produced his Natural History of the Carolinas, Florida and the Bahama Islands. Other names for Catesby's lily are pine lily and southern red lily.
This image won Honorable Mention in the Advanced category of Orange Audubon Society's 2012 Chertok Open Nature Photography contest. This same photograph was awarded top honors in the Nature category for the Autumn 2011 period of the Florida State Forest Photo Contest.

Michaux's Cupgrass - Eriochloa michauxii - André Michaux (1746-1802)    $     ?
Michaux's Cupgrass - Eriochloa michauxii - André Michaux (1746-1802)
The green and purple inflorescence of Michaux's cupgrass was photographed at Tomoka State Park. This grass is named for André Michaux who first discovered this species in 1788 near Matanzas Inlet. Michaux was the royal botanist for King Louis XVI of France and explored Florida in the late 1700's. Walter Kingsley Taylor and Eliane M. Norman, both of central Florida, co-authored the book André Michaux in Florida: An Eighteenth Century Botanical Journey, which is included in this display.

Bartram's Ixia - Calydorea caelestina - William Bartram (1739-1823)    $     ?
Bartram's Ixia - Calydorea caelestina - William Bartram (1739-1823)
William Bartram travelled to Florida from his home in Philadelphia a number of times, initially with his father John Bartram and later on his own, documenting his interactions with, and observations of the natives, as well as the animals and plants that he found. His writings were eventually published as the popular Travels through North and South Carolina, Georgia, East and West Florida, a more recent edition of this book is included in the exhibit. The chief of the Alachua tribe named William 'puc-puggy', which was 'flower hunter' in their language.

Rugel's Pawpaw - Deeringothamnus rugelii - Ferdinand Rugel (1806-1879)    $     ?
Rugel's Pawpaw - Deeringothamnus rugelii - Ferdinand Rugel (1806-1879) Rugel's Pawpaw - Deeringothamnus rugelii - red flower form
Rugel's pawpaw, also known as yellow squirrel banana, is named for Ferdinand Rugel who discovered this little plant near New Smyrna in 1848. Rugel was a German pharmacist, doctor and professional field botanist who came to the US to collect specimens in the southern Appalachians and settled in Tennessee. He made expeditions into Florida and Cuba, mainly selling his collections in Europe. The only place in the world that Rugel's pawpaw has been found is Volusia County, making it both a state and county endemic plant. Also shown is the even rarer red flower form.

Curtiss' Milkweed #3 - Asclepias curtissii - Allen Hiram Curtiss (1845-1907)    $     ?
Curtiss' Milkweed #3 - Asclepias curtissii - Allen Hiram Curtiss (1845-1907)
Curtiss' milkweed is another Florida endemic found mostly in scrub habitats such as Lyonia Preserve in Deltona, the big scrub of Ocala National Forest where this photograph was made, or scrubby flatwoods. This milkweed is named for Allen Hiram Curtiss who collected many plant specimens throughout Florida in the late 1800's, at least dozen of these bear his name. Curtiss began his career as a professional collector in Virginia, moving to Jacksonville at age 30 to work for the United States Department of Agriculture. One of his tasks for the USDA was to obtain specimens of trees from the southern states for the 1876 Centennial exposition held in Philadelphia.

Harper's Beauty - Harperocallis flava - Roland MacMillan Harper (1878-1966)    $ ?
Harper's Beauty - Harperocallis flava - Roland MacMillan Harper (1878-1966)
Roland MacMillan Harper was a botanist and geographer working at various times for Georgia, Alabama and Florida throughout his career. He was fond of windshield botanizing while riding in trains or automobiles, he never learned to drive, and was known to take long solitary treks to note the smaller plants. He studied the bogs of the Apalachicola area, documenting the pitcher plants found there. Harper's observations of the coastal plain landscapes led him to become one of the early advocates of the use of fire to maintain the ecosystems, then strongly opposed by the US Forest Service. Sidney McDaniel, a young botanist and student of Robert Godfrey at Florida State University - in his dissertation on Sarracenia(pitcher plants) -noted Harper's work on pitcher plants. Near the time of Harper's death, McDaniel discovered a new species of tiny lily along Hwy 65 near Sumatra, and named it Harper's beauty. Harperocallis flava is now considered to be in the Tofieldiaceae family and is only found in the seepage slopes and wet prairies of the central Florida panhandle.

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