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COASTAL SEAROCKET

Cakile lanceolata is found in coastal strands of most Gulf coast states, Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands.

This is one of the larval host plants of the Great Southern White butterfly. The common name is derived from the shape of the conical seed pods.



COASTALPLAIN DAWNFLOWER

This small member of the morning-glory family is the most common of the dawnflowers in Florida.

Coastal dawnflower ranges throughout north Florida into the central panhandle and in the southeastern U.S. coastal states from Louisiana to North Carolina. The linear or narrowly oblong leaves are less than 1.2 cm wide and the corolla is more than twice as long as the sepals. The white blooms of Stylisma patens are usually solitary along the vine.



SKYBLUE LUPINE

This is one of the Lupines in Florida with blue flowers and simple leaves.

The other blue one is Gulf Coast Lupine, an endangered endemic found only in the panhandle that has obsolete stiplues. The stiplues on Lupinus diffusus are evident, although smaller than on Lady Lupine. Another blue flowered species is the sundial lupine, the only native lupine with radially compond leaflets. Skyblue lupine can be found in the southeast coastal states from Mississippi to North Carolina, and in Florida in the western panhandle and most of the peninsula.



ASHE'S CALAMINT

An occassional plant of the sandhills and scrub of central Florida, it is also known to occur in one southeastern Georgia county.

One of the distinguishing features of Clinopodium ashei are the highly revolute leaves.



CORALBEAN

The showy clusters of red flowers appear on tall stalks in the spring, often before or just as the distinctive leaves emerge.

Later in the year, the namesake poisonous red seeds develop between the constrictions in pea-shaped pods.



BLOODROOT

Bloodroot ranges throughout the United States east of the Rocky Mountains, but in Florida it is only found in the panhandle and the extreme northern part of the state.

Its habitat is slope forests, bluffs and calcareous hammocks. Sanguinaria canadensis usually has one leaf and one flower, each on separate stems. The white flowers typically have eight petals, but can have up to twice that many. Growing as tall as 10-12 inches, it is usually much shorter at flowering time. This photo was taken in the Cohutta Wilderness of Georgia.